Job search the Randori way – No.20

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Interject, pause and redirect

To adjust an interpersonal situation and engage them more with your randori mind, use atemi and unbalance the situation. Once unbalanced you can easily resolve and redirect it to a resolution.

When you find yourself in a stressful situation, you can resume a more relaxed and balanced mind-set by mentally distracting the source of your stress. There are many forms of mental distractions, from a smile at an unsuspecting person, to a movement or clearing your throat or a statement. The point is to do something socially acceptable but at an unexpected time. The purpose of the unbalancing is to completely, in a moment, shift the focus of the meeting from the path it has taken.

When you unbalance the source of your stress there is a pause in the conversation or situation. You have the opportunity to take a momentary breather from the pace and gather your thoughts. You are now able to continue directing the conversation or situation in a more controlled manner, and guide it back on a productive course.

_______________________________________________
Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.19

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Lead to your goal

You cannot make anybody do what they do not want to do, or go where they haven’t committed themselves to go. You can, however, keep them going in the direction that they have chosen and in the single moment of their imbalance stabilize them in a deflected direction. Intercepting a situation with applied force or resistance freezes your mind and body. This allows the situation to control you.

Instead of waiting for the interviewer to ask the “right” questions, you can lead the conversation by directing their attention. A useful approach is to take what the interviewer has presented, answer the question and ask them to expand upon their topic. When they follow your request, you are now leading them to give more information to you. There is a point when you can then hand the lead to the interviewer so they can assume control and pace of the conversation.

When you’re leading it is important to avoid using negative words or phrases, these will freeze the conversation and potentially shift the outcome onto a single question. The conversational flow requires a continued positive approach by both participants.

The reciprocal use of this leading technique is important to ensure each person fully understands the position and skills necessary to perform the job function. Once you have achieved this conclusion you can both make an informed decision.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.18

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Relieve tension and frustration

If you communicate tension or attempt intimidation, others will sense this, causing them to resist and apply their strength and intentions against you. Your chances of achieving your goals will diminish severely because your aggressive direction has elevated the group’s resistance.

Recruiters and hiring managers don’t want to feel as though you are stalking them. Attempting to force yourself into a situation or outcome can make the other person resistant to your desires. We need to purposefully pursue our goals, doing so with a combination of civility, courtesy and common sense. Applying these three traits will allow you to enjoy potential long term benefits to your career path.

Conversing with recruiters, personal contacts and hiring managers requires finesse. The career related purpose of these conversations is to identify areas of mutual benefit. When you use a calm and controlled communicating style you have the chance to observe and listen, allowing you to understand their needs. When you understand their needs you can assess how your agenda fits in with theirs.

Avoid showing your personal tensions by regularly calling recruiters to ‘just check in’ or ‘seeing what’s new’. You can show your professional side when your call is geared towards advancing their goals, fill a requirement or add to their pool of candidates. This type of conversation gives you the opportunity to reconnect with professionals and strengthen your network of contacts.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.17

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Build from a solid base.

Each first connection is brief; sometimes the connection isn’t even physical. So enter each encounter and make the contact with the end already achieved. Commit yourself to the details of the resolution before you have to apply them.

First impressions happen in the very first seconds of a meeting, the rest is either a building process or an extraction from the situation. Imagine meeting someone who sneezes into their hand and then extends it to you; end of the meeting in your mind.

Reaching a positive resolution from any meeting comes from maintaining the connections you established at the initial encounter. An interview is the time to explore possibilities and determine how you can benefit the employer and vice versa. The resolution develops when you arrive at an understanding of their needs and matched with your abilities.

Begin every conversation knowing a resolution will arrive; remain open and unattached to a specific outcome. Your openness will allow you to maintain the connection and gain information about a company and the perspective of the hiring manager.

The information your gathering, combined with your ability to sustain interest and connections throughout the meeting, will lead to a resolution. While there may or may not be a fit for you from this particular meeting, the people in the meeting will remember you and your ability to discuss their needs. Having established a good connection from a productive meting, this connection may serve you well in future job searches or career progress.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.16

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Powerful communication is non-verbal.

Use the more powerful forms of communication to direct the people and then use words. Your words then become assurance to the listener and not a point of argument, conflict or tension.

Others see our personality, temperament, attitude and esteem through our mannerisms and behavior. Business value is created by matching capable people to the needs of the job. The people who achieve their goals instill trust and confidence in others. These same people translate a thought into a result and thereby become a valuable asset to any employer.

Whether you’re in a career transition or job search, being able to quickly and confidently communicate your value lets you set a good first impression. Even before you say a word, you set a good first impression when you move with assurance and grace. During a meeting or conversation be very aware of the personal space between you. Gaining closeness to somebody shows agreement. Others will do this to you when they perceive you as an asset, often by simply leaning forward a small increment towards you. This movement is so subtle you need an open and relaxed attitude to observe this important gesture of agreement or acceptance.

A conversation is often half way concluded before anybody speaks, and this is evident to those who have taken the time to learn non-verbal communication. It is said our body language controls our mind as much as our mind controls our body. Be assured, stand erect, proud without arrogance, smile, get your shoulders back and walk with dignity.
_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.15

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Deploy more than one tactic

When a number of problems arise involving a group of different people they are focused upon their narrowed viewpoint and little else, creating an artificial boundary for their perspective. Use this presumptive boundary by placing the different groups into each other’s path. When you do this it causes confusion and destabilizes the problems. Once they are destabilized, you can seize the void and direct your selected group more readily

Job searching tactics each have their own benefits and limitations which form the boundaries of your response. These boundaries can cause a diminishing return to your efforts, and your search can become stalled. For example, searching only job-boards, or only newspapers can result in limited results or interviews. This is especially true when you follow the prescribed rules and boundaries, which place you into a pool of thousands of applicants.

When a company advertises an open position solely on job-boards they expect a barrage of resumes. Finding and submitting your resume in another manner directly to the hiring manager will exploit this artificial boundary to your advantage by circumventing the storm of expected replies. Networking to get your resume into the hiring manager’s hands would present a more powerful tactic; doing so before the job is ever posted online, gives you a unique unfair advantage over everyone else.

Your search efficiency, the ability to get noticed and interviewed, will grow when you can see these boundaries and apply a variety of alternative search and submit tactics. Balancing all your search and submit methods keeps your search flexible, you avoid constructing your own self-limiting boundaries and stay one step ahead of everyone else.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.14

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Discerning value and importance

To discern the irrelevant from the important, you need to gauge the situation at its inception. You must always see what is real and what is not, to properly maintain your balance and conserve your energy.

Efficiently pursuing career goals is more than spending time writing and submitting resumes, networking and performing research. Your personal life can be dramatically impacted during the job search phase of your career. Setting your priorities and applying time management appropriately can stabilize this aspect of your life.

During a career transition, it’s easy to allow tension to enter your personal life and this tension can spill over into your writing, interviewing and communicating styles. You can unconsciously show tension when you want to present a calm, professional demeanor. During a job search you are quite likely to need the support to exhibit the confidence that you had during your employment phase. Your family and friends are your support network, make maintaining your network and home life a priority.

With a stable personal life, your uptime for job searching will be more productive. Here too, establish priorities to complete the important tasks first. Your daily or weekly time allocation for job searching will be individual to you and need to take into account a number of factors. The basic elements include: time for interviewing and networking, with interviews as #1 when they come. Personal research and submitting resumes can be relatively low priority since they can be done at any time during the day or week. Make certain to list and perform follow-up calls when they are suggested, especially with personal contacts. It’s been shown these conversations with individuals several connections deep can lead to employment or interviews and offer letters.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.13

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Balance, focus and energy

When people create a problem, they are giving you their focus, energy and balance. Use your calmness to accept and move this focus and energy while you redirect their balance. You are now leading. You now control this situation, directing and leading them without effort or conflict.

The control and direction of a situation depends upon balance. Something unstable, such as a spinning top, will follow an erratic course, achieving marginal forward progress before collapsing. Something that is fundamentally stable, such as a car, will roll forward at a steady rate.

The same rules of stability apply to your job search. When you spend your time explaining why you haven’t found a job, or been hired, despite a number of interviews, you are behaving like the spinning top in the prior paragraph. You’re compromising your balance and purpose with excuses and fears. Allowing your focus and motivation to dissipate makes you the victim of your own imbalance, while your energy degrades.

Achieve balance by re-acquainting yourself with your goal; review your actions and results; continue with those tactics that are working while jettisoning those that aren’t. Being emotionally balanced, your job search will progress similarly to the rolling car analogy. Your focus and balance are directing you towards a specific goal. Each movement towards the goal adds energy to your efforts, and you understand that you have control over your future. Applying your balanced approach will lead to your desired goal.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.12

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Move from decision making to immediate action

Judgments and decisions must be made and felt at the exact same instance. So, the decision is the action and the result is what and where you created the resolution.

Career search is a process of assembling and analyzing information, developing conclusions and acting upon them. As a professional you’ve used this process to develop plans and back-ups to those plans. You’ve also learned how to detect when a process is breaking down or needs modification. This same ability can be applied to your career search ensuring it doesn’t loose its efficiency. One sign of a deteriorating search is arriving at a decision point and either you don’t implement your choice or you wait and miss your time window. For example, you have a hiring managers’ number to call, but you put off making the call, even though you have plenty of time.

Highly effective job searchers understand the entire search cycle is a process and treat it as such. Remind yourself that you, and only you, are responsible for your own search. As the manager of the search you need to make timely decisions, since the process is very time dependant. Accomplishing this is as easy as planning a time to make a decision and be able to act on it immediately. From the previous example, you could hold off on deciding how to approach the hiring manager until you have the time to actually call them and discuss the topic that you have in mind. This will allow you to gain a better sense of direction and use the results of the telephone conversation to plan your next steps.

This decision to action practice will help you to develop a methodology for analyzing and productively using information. Making timely actions part of your process allows you to use your time effectively and achieve your goals.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com

Job search the Randori way – No.11

Randori (translated as “making order out of chaos” or “grasping freedom”) is an ancient eastern art. Typically practiced in a number of forms of martial arts, it revolves around 20 principles to manage 6 factors: Mind, Movement, Body, Purpose, Communication, Environment. We’ve taken a little “poetic license” but have come up with the job seekers Randori, or the translation I really like “making order out of chaos”.

Establish the rhythm of a meeting

Establish the obvious rhythm of the environment through your movement. This allows you to use your rhythm to decide where and how you will act.

Polished communication skills allow you to convey the maximum information about your abilities during a job search. Before you can present your information to others in a meeting, you need to build some rapport with the other person.

Have you noticed when two people are actively engaged in a conversation, they seem to be mirroring each others body language, gestures and facial expressions, speech rate and cadence, hand, body and eye movement. This is something that is done subconsciously and is the sure sign of rapport.

You have already heard that a great first impression is a large factor in determining the outcome; set the other person at ease by offering a warm smile and greeting. You can then look for the subtle cues they are giving off, and start to pace your movements and speech in a rhythm that closely resembles (or mirrors) that of the person you’re meeting. This doesn’t mean you’re mimicking them; instead follow the person’s movements with approximate movements of your own. For example, if the interviewer sits and rests their hands on a table, when you sit, rest one of your hands on the table.

When done properly, you can gain acceptance on a non-verbal level, which comprise about 70% of our total human communication. Once in this rhythm, you can slowly adjust your rhythm from the interviewer’s back to your own. The interviewer will most often follow the new pace. Now you are directing the pace and the conversation. Your message can be more readily heard and accepted at this point.

As the end of the meeting approaches return your mannerisms to following the rhythm and pace of the interviewer. This can be done within a few sentences and body movements. At the conclusion you can thank the interviewer in the same tone, gesture and energy as they do you.

_______________________________________________

Other articles in the Randori series: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Greg, an expert Aikido practitioner, had taken these Randori principles and applied them to a business setting, and we thought they applied equally to the job search itself. You can learn more about Randori and Greg at Randorimind.com